Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

Date Postedsort ascending
Four of the Department of Energy’s ‘Top 40’ research milestones since 1977 involved Argonne scientists. (Image courtesy of Claire Ballweg/Department of Energy and National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.)
Reaching the Department of Energy’s ‘Top 40’

The U.S. Department of Energy honors Argonne researchers in top 40 research-paper countdown.

January 3, 2018
Oleo Sponge picks up oil during tests at Argonne. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nine ways Argonne advanced science and technology in 2017

As 2018 approaches, Argonne looks back at nine cool stories that came out of research projects and collaborations at the laboratory.

December 21, 2017
The EuroMPI/USA 2017 conference, held at Argonne, allowed the founding developers of the Message Passing Interface to celebrate its 25th anniversary. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Pioneers of high-performance computing library reunite

The founding developers of the Message Passing Interface reunited for a one-day symposium celebrating the 25th anniversary of the common language they created to allow highly parallelized and diverse computer processors to communicate.

November 22, 2017
A 3-D rendering shows simulated solar convection realized at different rotation rates. Regions of upflow and downflow are rendered in red and blue, respectively. As rotational influence increases from left (non-rotating) to right (rapidly rotating), convective patterns become increasingly more organized and elongated. Understanding the sun's location along this spectrum represents a major step toward understanding how it sustains a magnetic field. (Image courtesy of Nick Featherstone and Bradley Hindman, University of Colorado Boulder.)
The inner secrets of planets and stars

An INCITE research team, led by Jonathan Aurnou of UCLA, is using Mira to develop advanced models to study magnetic field generation on Earth, Jupiter and the sun at an unprecedented level of detail.

October 31, 2017
The Argonne-led <em>Multiscale Coupled Urban Systems</em> project aims to help city planners better examine complex systems, understand the relationships between them and predict how changes will affect them. The ultimate goal is to help officials identify the best solutions to benefit urban communities. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Exascale and the city

The Argonne-led Multiscale Coupled Urban Systems project will create a computational framework for urban developers and planners to evaluate integrated models of city systems and processes. With this framework, city planners can better examine complex systems, understand the relationships between them and predict how changes will affect them. It can ultimately help officials identify the best solutions to benefit urban communities.

October 16, 2017
Recently, 70 scientists — graduate students, computational scientists, and postdoctoral and early-career researchers — attended the fifth annual Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC) in St. Charles, Illinois. Over two weeks, they learned how to seize opportunities offered by the world’s fastest supercomputers. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Leaning into the supercomputing learning curve

Scientists need to learn how to take advantage of exascale computing. This is the mission of the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC), which held its annual two-week training workshops over the summer.

October 6, 2017
This shows the HACC cosmology simulation, which combines high spatial and temporal resolution in a large cosmological volume. The high temporal resolution tracks the evolution of structures in great detail and correlates formation histories to the environments in which the structures form. (Image courtesy of Silvio Rizzi and Joe Insley/Argonne Leadership Computing Facility/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Cartography of the cosmos

There are hundreds of billions of stars in our own Milky Way galaxy, interspersed with all manner of matter, from the dark to the sublime. This is the universe that Argonne researcher Salman Habib is trying to reconstruct, structure by structure, combining telescope surveys with next-generation data analysis and simulation techniques currently being primed for exascale computing.

September 25, 2017
A simulated sky image of galaxies produced by running Argonne-developed high-performance computing codes and then running a galaxy formation model.  Argonne has collaborated with the University of Illinois, teaming up two supercomputers to perform simulation and data analysis of extremely large-scale, computationally intensive models of the universe. (Image by Lindsey Bleem, Nan Li, and the HACC team/Argonne National Laboratory; Mike Gladders/University of Chicago.)
Big Bang – The Movie

In a new approach to enable scientific breakthroughs, researchers linked together supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

August 24, 2017
Above: 3-D structures of adenine riboswitch RNA calculated using RS3D, a computer program that runs on the supercomputer Mira. RNAs like adenine riboswitch are biological structures found in all human cells; they help control how and when genes are expressed. Some of these structures are linked to cancer and other diseases, and by using RS3D to learn more about them, researchers can better understand how associated diseases evolve, which could lead to better treatments or cures. (Image by Wei Jiang, Argonne National Laboratory; Yuba Bhandari and Yun-Xing Wang, National Cancer Institute.)
Tackling disease in three dimensions: supercomputers help decode RNA structure

In collaboration with staff from the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, researchers at the National Cancer Institute have perfected a technique that accurately computes the 3-D structure of RNA sequences. This method, which relies on a computer program known as RS3D and supercomputer Mira gives researchers studying cancer and other diseases structural insights about associated RNAs that can be used to advance computer-assisted drug design and development.

July 12, 2017
This image is a small portion of an output from the "Q Continuum" cosmology simulation; the full simulation evolves more than half a trillion particles. Exascale systems will further enable researchers to run advanced simulations like this to shed more light on the key ingredients that make up our universe. (Image courtesy of the Hardware/Hybrid Accelerated Cosmology Code (HACC) team.)
How to build software for a computer 50 times faster than anything in the world

Researchers at Argonne are working to create new and adapt existing software technologies to operate at exascale by overcoming challenges found in several key areas, such as resiliency, data reduction, software libraries and the management of memory, power and computational resources.

June 15, 2017